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A Reflection and Prayer for the Fall

Whether or not we follow a school schedule, September often brings with it a feeling of newness, a sense of starting over, or a readiness for moving forward our personal hopes and dreams. In the spiritual tradition of the Sisters of St. Joseph, with their roots in 17th century France, we believe God is always asking “What more will you let me do for you?” The more, “le plus,” is not so much about doing more as it is about being more

The Gospel stories are filled with examples of Jesus’ desire to do “more” for us: giving new sight to the blind, helping the paralytic and lame to move, and telling the person with the clutched fists to stretch out his arms. God does not want us to be blind, to have closed fists, to be stuck or to be less than we are created to be. God asks us: Do you want me to make your unfinished life more complete and whole? Of course, letting God do more in us always is always a call to change. God’s grace and healing in us challenge us to new and different ways to see, to think, to reach out, to encounter, to embrace and to include.

In our moments of quiet and reflection, let us be open to God’s question: What more can I do for you? As we pray for ourselves and the many needs of our broken world, may we become what we pray.

"Becoming What We Pray"
(James Marchionda, OP)

When the hungry are fed, the naked are clothed,
and children living on the street are given a home,
when believers truly practice what we pray
then the Kingdom of God will be near. 

When the lonely are loved, the frightened are freed,
and women everywhere are treated equally,
when believers truly practice what we pray
then the Kingdom of God will be near. 

When the nations at war put down all their arms
and troops from every country can return to their homes,
when our politics embody what we pray
then the world will be transformed.

When respect for the earth is greater than greed,
and human laws reflect creation’s dignity,
when believers truly practice what we pray
then the Kingdom of God will be near. 

When our tolerance grows beyond all our fears and we view one another as the image of God,
when believers truly practice what we pray, then the Kingdom of God will be near.